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The Artist’s Inspiration- Does This Matter to the Viewer?

Artists have the ability to change people's moods, thoughts and emotions in the journey we call life. We are often told to create our art and leave the interpretation to the viewer. As an artist I am inspired by so much in the world around me. At the same time, I have always found it quite interesting to learn about other artists' inspiration and vision for creating their art work. Do other art enthusiasts enjoy this? Or does this interfere with how a piece of art touches the viewer's own heart and emotions? I've always been involved in writing, and published a number of my blog articles in various holistic health e-zines when I was an RN and had a practice in the field of healing. My genre was both memoir and inspirational writing which focused upon life cycle events that affected women, who were my client base. Now that my work is that of an artist, who makes glass art, pottery and paintings, I am told to simply make art and leave the description or inspiration for the piece out of the equation. 


I am very curious about this and would love to hear comments about what people think.


Does the artist's inspiration for their work matter to the viewer?


Would understanding the artist better regarding their artwork add to the viewer's experience in gaining the artist's perspective?

Would that add to your experience?


OR


Do you simply prefer to look at the art work and create your own interpretation and experience? 

Please share and leave your comments below. I would so love to know your opinion on this!

'Sunflowers and Grey Barn' - acrylic painting created from a photograph taken in Canadian countryside. https://www.amyreissnerart.com/gallery-2?pgid=k3kwssbu2-f7202722-e771-44aa-95e5-59f6ee334008


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7 comentários


Amy Reissner
Amy Reissner
02 de ago. de 2020

Hi Rosalind, thank you so much again for your comments. Yes, I agree it is a complicated discussion-both from the viewers perspective and from the artist's perspective, as well. I have just made my transition from being in the healing field to being a full-time artist.


When sharing my work in galleries, and at boutique holiday events, I have often been questioned as to where a painting was done-either in plein air, or from a photograph.


I am also often asked where I get my inspiration for my glass art-especially the more abstract pieces. Having said that, that is why I have started to share this information when I upload my pieces to my website, in my newsletters, or now…

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Amy Reissner
Amy Reissner
02 de ago. de 2020

This was sent to me via email from a lovely lady, who describes herself as a technophobe, but she gave me permission to add her comments here.


"Amy, beautiful work. I always prefer looking at art with a docent tour to better understand the artist’s interpretation. You included a sentence next to your beautiful sunflowers & Grey Barn painting which was appreciated by me.  It had me wondering if you painted it over the photograph or just used the photo as a reference.  If I had to guess i would say the later." JS


My email response to JS was that it was painted from a photograph I had taken.

Curtir

It’s a complicated discussion. If the viewer is looking at a painting of a barn, flowers, seascapes etc it doesn’t add much to know the exact local or do we need to know more when looking at works by DeKooning or Rothko. However many of us get a lot more out of complex or classic paintings when viewed with a knowledgeable docent or curator . Then pointing out details, making comparisons of the artist’s other works, whom he/she studied with, their bio, personal life, & Provence of the painting

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Amy Reissner
Amy Reissner
31 de jul. de 2020

Thank you so much for your additional comment, Rosalind. So in looking at this particular painting, it would have been fine to not necessarily have the explanation of where the landscape was located, or whether it was painted en plain air or painted from a photograph? You would have been fine simply understanding that it was in the countryside...and of course the title of the painting is there as well. Is that right?

Curtir

In some instances it’s not necessary - especially if it’s just a colorful pattern, still life or even nature. If it’s intricate, mythological, historical or psychological, I might want to know more about it or the artist.

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